Aesop's Jacked Fables

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The Mules and the Robbers

TWO MULES well-laden with packs were trudging along. One carried panniers filled with dung, the other had sacks filled with vicious beetles and millipedes. The Mule carrying the dung walked with head erect, unconcerned about the contents of his burden, and tossed up and down the clear-toned bells fastened to his neck. His companion followed with quiet, cautious step as his pack rustled and clicked.

All of a sudden Robbers rushed upon them from their hiding-places, and in the scuffle with their owners, wounded with a sword the Mule carrying the dung, which they greedily seized until they took notice of the contents. They tossed the sacks to the ground in disgust and one of the Robbers pointed to the other Mule, cowering by some bushes beside the path.

The Mule trembled and twitched. The robbers looked at each other and cautiously approached. As one of the robbers reached out for the packs the squirmy crackling from within them intensified. They looked at each other again. The Mule twitched more violently and with a nasal sneeze blew a spray of blood out of his nose, which began dribbling. A few centipedes that had managed to crawl up the folds of the fabric fell to the ground. Seeing this the Mule pushed himself sideways against the bushes in an attempt to avoid contact with the vermin.

"What sort of Merchantry is this?" one of the Robbers gasped.

"Let's be off," announced the other. They grabbed the panniers of dung and trudged off into the woods, glancing over their shoulders from time to time.

On the return trip the Mule that had been robbed and wounded bewailed his misfortunes. The other replied, "I am indeed glad that I have chronic nosebleeds and a cargo of pure horror, for I have lost nothing, nor am I hurt with any wound."

The Mules and the Robbers (original fable)

TWO MULES well-laden with packs were trudging along. One carried panniers filled with money, the other sacks weighted with grain. The Mule carrying the treasure walked with head erect, as if conscious of the value of his burden, and tossed up and down the clear-toned bells fastened to his neck. His companion followed with quiet and easy step. All of a sudden Robbers rushed upon them from their hiding-places, and in the scuffle with their owners, wounded with a sword the Mule carrying the treasure, which they greedily seized while taking no notice of the grain. The Mule which had been robbed and wounded bewailed his misfortunes. The other replied, "I am indeed glad that I was thought so little of, for I have lost nothing, nor am I hurt with any wound."

View the orginal fable View the jacked fable Perry #491
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