Aesop's Jacked Fables

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The King's Son and the Painted Lion

A KING, whose only son was fond of martial exercises, had a dream in which he was warned that his son would be killed by a lion. Afraid the dream should prove true, he built for his son a pleasant palace and adorned its walls for his amusement with all kinds of life-sized animals, among which was the picture of a lion.

When the young Prince saw this, his grief at being thus confined burst out afresh, and, standing near the lion, he said: "O you most detestable of animals! Through a lying dream of my father's, I am shut up on your account in this palace as if I had been a girl."

He then noticed a hole in the wall where the lion's mouth was. He slowly drew closer to the hole. As he peered into the darkness a greasy, balding rat sprung onto his face with a blood-curdling squeek. It dug its claws into the sides of his face and gnawed on his forehead as he flailed backwards. He wanted to scream but the creature was trying to force its filthy little dick between his lips. All the Prince could do was make a nasal whine as he clamped his mouth shut.

After a few eternal seconds he regained some presence of mind, took the rat in his hands and broke its back. He then hurled it at the wall with all of his strength as he bellowed out every obscenity he could muster and spat repeatedly. The plague soon set in, from which he died not many days later.

We had better bear our troubles bravely than try to escape them.

The King's Son and the Painted Lion (original fable)

A KING, whose only son was fond of martial exercises, had a dream in which he was warned that his son would be killed by a lion. Afraid the dream should prove true, he built for his son a pleasant palace and adorned its walls for his amusement with all kinds of life-sized animals, among which was the picture of a lion. When the young Prince saw this, his grief at being thus confined burst out afresh, and, standing near the lion, he said: "O you most detestable of animals! through a lying dream of my father's, which he saw in his sleep, I am shut up on your account in this palace as if I had been a girl: what shall I now do to you?" With these words he stretched out his hands toward a thorn-tree, meaning to cut a stick from its branches so that he might beat the lion. But one of the tree's prickles pierced his finger and caused great pain and inflammation, so that the young Prince fell down in a fainting fit. A violent fever suddenly set in, from which he died not many days later

We had better bear our troubles bravely than try to escape them.

View the orginal fable View the jacked fable Perry #363
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