Aesop's Jacked Fables

home | t.o.c. | random | previous page | next page 

The Fishermen

SOME FISHERMEN were out trawling their nets. Perceiving them to be very heavy, they danced about for joy and supposed that they had taken a large catch. When they had dragged the nets to the shore they found but few fish. The nets were full of sand and stones. The men were all the more disappointed because they had formed such very different expectations.

One of their company, an old man, said, "Let us cease lamenting, my mates, for, as it seems to me, sorrow is always the twin sister of joy; and it was only to be looked for that we, who just now were over-rejoiced, should next have something to make us sad."

"Easy for you to say," said another, "being a man renowned for his ability to live off of sand and stones. But I for one am fucking hungry!" At that he attacked the old man with all of his might, kicking him in the head and such, until he was reduced to a blubbering cripple.

The other Fishermen, horrified by the outburst, seized the attacker and put him to death. And by dining on his flesh they recovered enough strength to attempt the next day's trawling.

The Fishermen (original fable)

SOME FISHERMEN were out trawling their nets. Perceiving them to be very heavy, they danced about for joy and supposed that they had taken a large catch. When they had dragged the nets to the shore they found but few fish: the nets were full of sand and stones, and the men were beyond measure cast down so much at the disappointment which had befallen them, but because they had formed such very different expectations. One of their company, an old man, said, "Let us cease lamenting, my mates, for, as it seems to me, sorrow is always the twin sister of joy; and it was only to be looked for that we, who just now were over-rejoiced, should next have something to make us sad."

View the orginal fable View the jacked fable Perry #13
©2006 subsocial.com contact < 224 >